Healthy and Safe Facility Handbook
The Healthy & Safe Facility Handbook - Free Download

Sponsor

Infection Prevention for Dummies

 

Related TopicsShareSectionsTopics

Sponsor

Partners

Ads, ad links, products and content on this page are not necessarily endorsed by these organizations.

  • Baron & Budd Logo
  • We-Support-Cleaning-Industry-Research-Institute-CIRI-Large
  • Education Facilities Clearinghouse
  • IEHA
  • ISSA-CIMS-logo
  • The IICRC Logo
  • McMorrow Report
Advisory Board
  • Tom L. Adams
  • Gary Allread Ph.D.
  • Scott Armour MS
  • Stephen P. Ashkin
  • Anila Bello ScD
  • Dina Belon-Sayre
  • Alan Bigger
  • Dr. Brandon Brevig DO, MBA
  • Holly Brown-Williams
  • Carla Burke
  • Dr. Graham Cliff
  • Richard
  • Kumkum M. Dilwali MS, LEED-AP
  • Robert Donofrio Ph.D.
  • Edward A. Emmett MD, MS
  • Peter Ermish
  • Dennis Fetzer
  • Aileen Gagney MArch, MFA, GA-C, HHS
  • Sue Garwood
  • John Gayetsky
  • Charles P. Gerba Ph.D.
  • Lisa A. Gilmore MBA, MSW
  • Jay Glasel Ph.D.
  • Elizabeth B. Goldsmith Ph.D.
  • Dr. Nancy Goodyear
  • Jessica Green Ph.D.
  • Kristin Pederson Gulrud Ph.D.
  • Shel Horowitz
  • Chris Jack
  • Russell J. Kendzior
  • Jason Marshall ScD
  • David Mudarri Ph.D.
  • Mike Nalley
  • Robert W. Powitz Ph.D., M.P.H, R.S., D.L.A.A.S.
  • Rich Prill
  • Margaret M. Quinn ScD, CIH
  • Dennis J. Randolph EFM
  • Dr. John J. Ratey M.D.
  • Mark Rossolo
  • Richard J. Shaughnessy Ph.D.
  • Bette Simpson
  • Craig Slatin Sc.D., MPH
  • Carl Solomon Sr.
  • Barbara M. Soule R.N., M.P.A., C.I.C.
  • Anne C. Steinemann Ph.D.
  • Andrew J. Streifel
  • Nelson Swartz PH.D.
  • Benjamin D. Tanner Ph.D.
  • Dr. Philip Tierno, Jr.
  • Charles D. (Chuck) Treser MPH, DAAS
  • Daniel Wagner
  • Dr. Keith Warriner
  • Bill Weigand
  • Laura Wenger RN
  • Carol Westinghouse
  • Robert A. Woellner
  • Gene Woodard
  • Jerry Yudelson PE, MS, MBA, LEED AP

Commentary on Cleaning Standards

There has been much talk about establishing definitive cleaning standards within our industry, but efforts have met with mixed success.

Why?  I believe the reason is basic.

A cleaning standard must be defined by a cleaning purpose.

If to "clean to protect or enhance health" is the purpose, the standard will be quite different than to "clean for appearance".

If to "clean" within budget or to save time is the purpose, the standard will be defined in less ennobling ways.

Bottom Line: The cleaning industry−in its current state of thinking−cannot create one unified standard (though it can create “specs” based on particular customer requirements) because the thinking about cleaning is not unified.

 

Domestic example: If a mother cleans because she doesn't want her family to become ill, or to optimize the indoor environment because she loves her family, that's a different motive and process than to clean because company is coming or because she wants to save time or money.

Simply stated, since cleaning is currently performed for different purposes, cleaning will consistently be measured by a variety of different standards.

In addition, as long as the customers of the cleaning industry think of cleaning in a variety of ways−many of them far less than optimal−the cleaning industry (a for-profit enterprise) will respond with a hodgepodge of "standards" that reflect a variety of different customer demands (or purposes).

Thus, it is far more important to change the way people think about cleaning−starting first with the people within the industry and then embracing people (customers) outside the industry.

Since safety and the protection of human health are major standards drivers in other successful fields (from electricians to engineers) one of the industry’s major initiatives should be to promote cleaning as an indoor environmental discipline (science) in the public interest. Once accomplished, a standard then becomes viable. Until that happens, no standard is possible.

Moreover, I simply believe that to "clean to protect or enhance health" is the best foundation for the industry to build a lucrative and dignified future upon (with appearance, surface preservation, etc. as pillars of the structure).
 
Before such a dominant “health philosophy”−that produces corresponding specs, standards, etc−can prevail, we must work at changing thinking.
 
We are all in the PR and marketing business, you could say...

 

More Dignity Please

 

Having cleaned for a living for many years (before becoming an "armchair expert"), and witnessing the low self-esteem and lack of dignity afforded the cleaning worker in many instances, I have a personal axe to grind.  
 
Our industry lacks heart and a dignified reason for existence−a motivating core belief, if you will.
 
By stark contrast, the medical profession has a credo known as the Hippocratic oath ("Do no harm"). It is what inspires many young men and women to become doctors and nurses.
 
The ultimate standard of care is to "do no harm" and to promote healing and health.  That philosophical basis is what motivates many healthcare professionals to work long hours (not to mention the need to pay off medical school bills and afford high liability insurance premiums).
 
Still, medicine is a business. It must deal with many business realities, and for this reason care is not always optimal, and other standards (specs?) must be adopted to achievable a practical standard that is also affordable.
 
But, medicine, at its core, has its dignity.
 
The cleaning industry is not so fortunate. It is a much maligned field with a low place on the proverbial totem pole.
 
What the cleaning industry needs first and foremost, at its core, is an ultimate "standard of care", a reason for being, the equivalent of "do no harm", a philosophical foundation.
 
Just as it is very important to know *why* a doctor decided to practice medicine, it is also important that we know *why* we clean.
 
I believe that to "clean to protect or enhance health" is such a core philosophy upon which an industry can redefine itself.
 
All the other standardization aspects will follow when the industry finds dignity and deep purpose−dare we say inspiration?−in its core beliefs.

Commentary on Cleaning Standards

Created on December 16th, 2016.  Last Modified on December 17th, 2016

The Healthy Facilities Institute provides the information on HealthyFaciltiesInstitute.com as a free service to the public.

 

While an effort is made to ensure the quality of the content and credibility of sources listed on this site, HFI provides no warranty - expressed or implied - and assumes no legal liability for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, product or process disclosed on or in conjunction with the site. The views and opinions of the authors or originators expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of HFI: its principals, executives, board members, advisors or affiliates.

About Allen P. Rathey

Allen P. Rathey

Allen P. Rathey is president of The Healthy Facilities Institute (HFI).  He promotes healthy indoor environments, and writes and speaks on healthy cleaning and facility topics.

 
 
 
 

© 2010 - 2017 Healthy Facilities Institute®
All Rights Reserved
News / About / Contact Us

Proud Supporter of:

OnlineCourses.com

OpenCourseWare

Disclaimer

The Healthy Facilities Institute provides the information on HealthyFaciltiesInstitute.com as a free service to the public.

 

While an effort is made to ensure the quality of the content and credibility of sources listed on this site, HFI provides no warranty - expressed or implied - and assumes no legal liability for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, product or process disclosed on or in conjunction with the site. The views and opinions of the authors or originators expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of HFI: its principals, executives, board members, advisors or affiliates.

Sitemap